CucCAP research identifies novel genetic source of resistance to Fusarium wilt race 1 in wild watermelon

Fusarium wilt race 1, caused by the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.: Fr. f. sp. niveum (E.F. Sm.) W.C. Snyder & H.N. Hans (Fon), is a major disease of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) in the United States and throughout the world. While Fusarium wilt race 1 resistance from chromosome 1 has been incorporated into several watermelon […]

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Cuccap Project Develops Extension Fact Sheets for Important Cucurbit Diseases in English and Spanish

Members of the CucCAP extension team [Dr. Mary Hausbeck, Michigan State University; Dr. Angela Linares, University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez; Dr. Lina Quesada-Ocampo, North Carolina State University; Dr. Chris Smart, Cornell University] have developed 16 extension fact sheets to support stakeholders and impact cucurbit production in each region.  The fact sheets provide useful information […]

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CucCAP team developed a new database for cucurbit genomics

During the past several years, large amounts of genomic, transcriptomic and genetic data have been accumulated for cucurbits. These data have been extensively used to facilitate cucurbit research and breeding. However, efficient access, and ability to mine and analyze these large-scale datasets pose challenges to researchers, especially those with limited bioinformatics expertise. Therefore, the CucCAP […]

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CucCAP Researchers Provide High Resolution Genetic Characterization of the U.S. Cucumber Germplasm Collection

Germplasm collections (a.k.a. gene banks) are a crucial resource to conserve natural genetic diversity and provide a source of novel traits for crop improvement such as disease and pest resistance, increased yield, and improved fruit quality. Optimal collection, preservation and utilization of these resources depends upon knowledge of the genetic variation present within the collection. […]

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CucCAP research identifies a cucumber gene for resistances to downy mildew, angular leaf spot and anthracnose

Development of varieties with multiple disease resistances is always an important goal for plant breeders. Dr. Yiqun Weng’s Lab at the Vegetable Crops Research Unit in USDA-ARS, Madison, Wisconsin identified the STAYGREEN gene that is responsible for the PI 197087-derived triple-disease resistances.

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